• Post Office Employee Finds Two Missing Children In Two Weeks On Route

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    A case of a teenager that had gone missing in San Diego County back in April this year took a surprising twist when Chyanne Thomas, a post office worker, accidentally spotted a teenage girl while driving her route.

    A teenage girl with autism had gone missing and the police were unable to find her

    The girl’s family initially reported the case to the authorities when she failed to return home but the search for the missing child yielded no results. The girl, Abby, who has autism had gone missing on Thursday, April 18th, according to a Facebook post published by a family friend a day later.



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    “There is a complete mobile unit set up down at the corner of East Vista Way and bobier there is a hundred plus person search and rescue looking for my daughter also there is four fives dogs that helicopter was out for several hours this afternoon…” the post said.

    Chyanne Thomas, who is employed with the Vista Post Office, was familiar with the area in which Abby had last been, a part of her mail delivery route. The police contacted Chyanne while she was on a shift, a day after Abby had gone missing.

    Thanks to Chyanne, Abby was able to return home to her family

    Chyanne’s knowledge of her route proved to be of vital importance. On Friday, April 20th, she spotted a teenage girl in Vista off of East Bobier Drive while she was driving. Abby thought Chyanne herself had gone missing whereupon Chyanne decided to play along.

    “She goes, ‘You’re missing? I’ll stay. I’ll help’ … I played her role. I [didn’t] want her to run away,” she told media afterwards.

    Her method proved successful and Abby was safely reunited with her family.



    A surprising twist

    But that was hardly the end of Chyanne’s story. She was predestined to be a hero and only two weeks later she discovered a girl who was all alone and visibly scared. The girl was abandoned and didn’t speak English. When no parents showed up, Chyanne came to the rescue again.

    “I immediately jumped out of the truck again,” she said. “She came and squeezed me so tight, with tears. She was so excited that someone helped out. I had training in behavioral health and working with children on the spectrum,” said Thomas. “It helped me to know what to do in the situation.”

    The girl’s mother had arrived after Chyanne reported the case to the police and everything ended well, as with Abby’s case.

    “I was just at the right place at the right time”

    Both cases attracted considerable media attention and made Chyanne famous but she stated that she doesn’t consider herself a hero.

    “I’m not a hero. I was just at the right place at [the right time],” she said. “I’m glad that the parents were reunited with their kids safe and sound.”

    Despite the fact she doesn’t think of herself as a hero, Chyanne was rewarded by the National Association of Letter Carriers for her inspiring acts.



    Her story proves once again that true heroes walking among us. They don’t do it for recognition or to attract attention and their only motive is to help people in need.

    Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

    Source: The Western Journal

    Source: Fox 5, Flickr/Rusty_Clark


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  • Post Office Employee Finds Two Missing Children In Two Weeks On Route

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    A case of a teenager that had gone missing in San Diego County back in April this year took a surprising twist when Chyanne Thomas, a post office worker, accidentally spotted a teenage girl while driving her route.

    A teenage girl with autism had gone missing and the police were unable to find her

    The girl’s family initially reported the case to the authorities when she failed to return home but the search for the missing child yielded no results. The girl, Abby, who has autism had gone missing on Thursday, April 18th, according to a Facebook post published by a family friend a day later.



    ss="article-ad-horizontal center-xs">

     

    “There is a complete mobile unit set up down at the corner of East Vista Way and bobier there is a hundred plus person search and rescue looking for my daughter also there is four fives dogs that helicopter was out for several hours this afternoon…” the post said.

    Chyanne Thomas, who is employed with the Vista Post Office, was familiar with the area in which Abby had last been, a part of her mail delivery route. The police contacted Chyanne while she was on a shift, a day after Abby had gone missing.

    Thanks to Chyanne, Abby was able to return home to her family

    Chyanne’s knowledge of her route proved to be of vital importance. On Friday, April 20th, she spotted a teenage girl in Vista off of East Bobier Drive while she was driving. Abby thought Chyanne herself had gone missing whereupon Chyanne decided to play along.

    “She goes, ‘You’re missing? I’ll stay. I’ll help’ … I played her role. I [didn’t] want her to run away,” she told media afterwards.

    Her method proved successful and Abby was safely reunited with her family.



    A surprising twist

    But that was hardly the end of Chyanne’s story. She was predestined to be a hero and only two weeks later she discovered a girl who was all alone and visibly scared. The girl was abandoned and didn’t speak English. When no parents showed up, Chyanne came to the rescue again.

    “I immediately jumped out of the truck again,” she said. “She came and squeezed me so tight, with tears. She was so excited that someone helped out. I had training in behavioral health and working with children on the spectrum,” said Thomas. “It helped me to know what to do in the situation.”

    The girl’s mother had arrived after Chyanne reported the case to the police and everything ended well, as with Abby’s case.

    “I was just at the right place at the right time”

    Both cases attracted considerable media attention and made Chyanne famous but she stated that she doesn’t consider herself a hero.

    “I’m not a hero. I was just at the right place at [the right time],” she said. “I’m glad that the parents were reunited with their kids safe and sound.”

    Despite the fact she doesn’t think of herself as a hero, Chyanne was rewarded by the National Association of Letter Carriers for her inspiring acts.



    Her story proves once again that true heroes walking among us. They don’t do it for recognition or to attract attention and their only motive is to help people in need.

    Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

    Source: The Western Journal

    Source: Fox 5, Flickr/Rusty_Clark


    Share on Facebook

    Get Positive News!

    Thank you for reading! If you would like to receive positive news to your inbox, please enter your email. We want to spread inspiration to others.






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